In The News

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These Arab Hackers Want To Make America Safe Again

Khalil Sehnaoui, a hacker based in Beirut, Lebanon, said he expected a lot of security experts across the Middle East to switch from cooperative to hostile as a result of Trump's move. "If anything it's going to make people with more skills pissed. Wouldn’t you be more pissed because it’s a senseless ban on people?" Khalil said.

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Les Banques Sont-Elles A L'Abri Des Cyber-Attaques?

Il faut bien avoir à l’esprit que quelles que soient les parades trouvées, les pirates redoubleront d’ingéniosité pour trouver la faille et qu’aucun système aussi perfectionné soit-il n’est invulnérable », affirme le cofondateur de Krypton, Khalil Sehnaoui

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Cyber-Scoop: Islamic State supporters hit by Android malware on Telegram

This malware runs in multiple stages, Khalil Sehnaoui, a Middle East-based cybersecurity specialist and founder of Krypton Security, told CyberScoop. “The exploit code is usually small and after successful exploitation it runs a dropper code which will in turn download new applications/malware in order to get more control of the system by escalating privileges.”

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Top 100 Influencers in Information Security

Information Security is one of the main challenges of the 21st Century; albeit more intensely for wealthy and developed countries, when it comes to privacy, safety of personal and professional data and infrastructure integrity. The IoT (Internet of Things) phenomenon is filling our homes and workplaces with inter-connected devices that lack proper security hardening.

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Daily Star: Cybersecurity risks loom for Lebanese banks

Clad in black converse emblazoned with the Batman emblem, jeans and a bracelet reading “HACKERS,” Jayson Street approached a Beirut bank last week. “I’m the IT guy from headquarters,” he told employees, in a thick American accent.Despite his manifest tech savvy, Street is not an IT guy, per se, and he wasn’t sent from headquarters.

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Security Lapse Exposed New York airport's Critical Servers For A Year

One file contained a list of usernames and passwords for various devices and systems, allowing unfettered access to the airport's internal network. Khalil Sehnaoui, founder of Krypton Security, and Brad Haines, a hacker and security researcher, analyzed the password file and a network schematic found among the files to determine the reach of a potential attacker. 

"The password file would give us full access to every component of the internal network," said Sehnaoui.

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